Norway

Norway ranks first in the world in terms of the number of electric vehicles per capita.

About Country

    Continent

    Europe

    Capital

    Oslo

    Population

    5,421,241

    World share 

    0.1 %

    Land area

    365,268 km²

    Official Languages

    - Bokmal Norwegian
    - Nynorsk Norwegian

    Unofficial Languages

    - Finnish
    - Sami

    Currency

    NOK

    Economy rating

    30

    Economy GDP

    444,519 millions USD

    ВВП на человека

    81,996 USD

Democracy Index

9.81

Full
democracy

*

Electoral process and pluralism

10
10

Functioning of government

9.64
9.64

Political participation

10
10

Political culture

10
10

Civil liberties

9.41
9.41

    Crime Rate

    0.5

    Safe zone

    Unemployment

    3.5 %

    Low unemployment

Expense and Salary

4.04

Middling

*

Average salary

9.27
9.27

Average expense

1.84
1.84

Average rent price

1.01
1.01

    Average salary

    6,515 USD

    Average expense

    1,057 USD

    Average rent price

    1,095 USD

Immigration

    Immigration difficulty

    Normal

    Recommended Savings

    12,911 USD

    Double citizenship

    Allowed

    Official site

    Immigration official website

    Compulsory exams

    Norwegian Language and Social Integration Exam

    Passport rating

    7 Amount of countries: 186

Immigration options

Immigration typeRequired TimeFee
Marriagefrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
5 years (for citizenship)
38 USD
Employeefrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)
38 USD
Studentfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)
38 USD
Businessfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)
38 USD
Refugeefrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)
0 USD


Marriage

Immigration feeImmigration Time
38 USDfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
5 years (for citizenship)

List of documents:
- Completed questionnaire;
- International passport;
- 2 color photos;
- Receipt of payment of the fee;
- General civil passport;
- Medical insurance;
- Certificate of no criminal record;
- Financial documents: bank statement with bank seal;
- Round-trip tickets with a closed departure date, travel itinerary, travel documents;
- Documents confirming a relationship or marriage.
Additional Information:
By marrying a Norwegian resident, you get the right to move to the country under the family reunification program.
Do not forget that you will have to prove the seriousness of your relationship, and you will also be checked periodically.

Employee

Immigration feeImmigration Time
38 USDfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)

List of documents:
- Completed questionnaire;
- International passport;
- 2 color photos;
- Receipt of payment of the fee;
- General civil passport;
- Medical insurance;
- Certificate of no criminal record;
- Financial documents: bank statement with bank seal;
- Round-trip tickets with a closed departure date, travel itinerary, travel documents;
- An invitation from the employer;
- Employment contract.
Additional Information:
A residence permit in Norway can be obtained by someone who is a good specialist or has good health to perform hard physical work in Norway.
There are three main ways to get this document:
- A specialist who is in search of work can get a residence permit (issued for a period of twelve months, extension is not expected)
- An employed employee can get a residence permit (in this case, an extension is expected, and in the future a specialist can apply for permanent residence)
- A qualified specialist can also get the coveted permission.

Student

Immigration feeImmigration Time
38 USDfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)

List of documents:
- Completed questionnaire;
- International passport;
- 2 color photos;
- Receipt of payment of the fee;
- General civil passport;
- Medical insurance;
- Certificate of no criminal record;
- Financial documents: bank statement with bank seal;
- Round-trip tickets with a closed departure date, travel itinerary, travel documents;
- Invitation from the university;
- Certificate of enrollment.
Additional Information:
Upon admission to an educational institution in Norway, you are issued a residence permit.
A person who wants to get an education must only confirm his financial viability.

Business

Immigration feeImmigration Time
38 USDfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)

List of documents:
- Completed questionnaire;
- International passport;
- 2 color photos;
- Receipt of payment of the fee;
- General civil passport;
- Medical insurance;
- Certificate of no criminal record;
- Financial documents: bank statement with bank seal;
- Round-trip tickets with a closed departure date, travel itinerary, travel documents;
- Resume;
- Certificate or diploma (translated into English and Norwegian);
- Business plan;
- Confirmation of the place of future residence;
- Statutory documents and confirmation of the movement of funds in the account.
Additional Information:
You can open your own business in Norway, this will allow you to obtain a residence permit.
The basis for obtaining such a document will be the registration of your company on the territory of the Kingdom.
At the same time, it should be borne in mind that the minimum authorized capital should be at least 13,000 euros.

Refugee

Immigration feeImmigration Time
0 USDfrom 5 to 10 days (paperwork)
7 years (for citizenship)

List of documents:
- Identity document;
- 2 color photos;
- Fill out a police statement on arrival.
Additional Information:
You can get to Norway as a refugee. To do this, you will need to prove the fact of harassment in your country on any basis: race, gender, nationality, religion, political views, social status. Military actions and natural disasters are also grounds for granting asylum.

Taxes

The fiscal system of Norway can be called one of the classic, traditional for European states.

The general rate for enterprises and other business entities is set at 25% of the amount of profit received.

A tax resident in Norway is a person who has been or is going to be in the territory of the state for more than 6 months. Income received by a resident of the country in Norway itself or on the territory of another state is taxed. Non-residents are required to pay taxes on income earned only in Norway.

The main tax that is levied on individuals in the country is personal income tax. Income tax in Norway is required to be paid by everyone — citizens of the state, migrants, stateless persons who are engaged in any paid activity on the territory of this state. The requirement for mandatory payment applies both to employed persons receiving wages and to self-employed citizens who work independently.

The income tax rate is 28%.
In addition to the above mandatory payment, you need to pay a social fee, the rate of which is set at 8.2%.

Social tax
Employees pay contributions of 7.8% from their wages, the basis for calculating the tax is income. Pension income is taxed at 3%.

Property tax.
If an individual in Norway has a holiday home, he must pay a tax of 2.5% of the assessed value of the property. There is no such tax for your main home. If the house is used exclusively for renting, it is defined as an entrepreneurial activity, the income from which is taxed at a rate of 28%. If the property is sold, then the profit received from the sale will not be taxed if the housing has been owned for more than 5 years and used by the owner as his own holiday home. Otherwise, you will have to pay 28% income tax.

The value added tax rate of 24% is levied on sales of goods and services, as well as export goods.

Education

In Norway, the education system consists of 4 main stages: preschool, primary, secondary and higher education. There are both public and private institutions.

Preschool education
Preschool education in Norway is not formally compulsory, but all Norwegian children from the age of 1 have the right to attend kindergarten before entering school. Kindergartens in Norway are not free. For both private and public, parents will have to pay about 3,000 kronor per month.

School education
Children study not 11, but 13 years old. The school system is clearly divided by age and students of different levels never meet each other:
- from 6 to 12 years old, children study in primary school;
- from 12 to 15 is considered a secondary school;
- from 16 to 19 is considered a high school.

In elementary school, the program is mandatory for everyone. It includes various subjects: Norwegian and English, mathematics, reading, physical education, music.

In high school, the program becomes a little more complicated. New subjects are beginning to be added: economics, ecology, basics of household management, accounting.

At the age of 16, Norwegians go to high school. The duration is 3 years. After graduating from high school, it can be assumed that the student has received a full secondary education.

There are 3 directions of student development:
- academic, where mathematics, geography, literature are studied in depth
- professional implies the study of subjects focused on the future profession
- special education designed for children with physical or mental disabilities. There are no exams as such.

Higher education
Both private and public universities are popular in the country. They can be specialized or general education. Sessions are given 2 times a year.

Studying at the university is free, but students have to make small contributions that go to maintain the institution itself. Usually the amount of the contribution does not exceed 60 euros.

There are 3 stages of higher Norwegian education in total:
- bachelor's degree lasts 3-4 years
- master's degree 2 years. In Norway, it is perceived as a logical continuation of the bachelor's degree, so there are no exams for admission. The selection is based on the average score
- doctoral studies. The length is standard — 3 years. In rare cases, it can reach 4 years.

Healthcare

The organizational structure of the Norwegian healthcare system is based on the principle of equal access to services for all residents of the country, regardless of their social and economic status, geographical location. This principle is approved by law.

The Norwegian health system is built on three main levels: national/State, at the level of Regional Health Authorities and municipal.

The whole of Norway is divided into four regions with Regional Health Authorities:
– Northern Norway;
– Central Norway;
– Western Norway;
– Southeastern Norway.

Regional health authorities own health trusts. Currently, there are 27 healthcare trusts, of which 21 are hospital trusts, 4 are pharmaceutical trusts, 1 is for pre–hospital services and 1 is an information technology trust.

Despite the predominance of the public sector in Norwegian healthcare, several private organizations are also involved in the provision of medical services. Their participation is more significant at the primary care level. Most doctors work for themselves, but in most cases they are also fully integrated into the public health system.

The National Insurance System (NSS) applies to all persons who are residents of Norway.

In Norway, there is no approved list of services that are covered by government funding. In practice, the healthcare system covers:
– prescription drugs;
– preventive services;
– basic care, including the services of general practitioners, physiotherapists;
– specialized outpatient and inpatient care;
– emergency care, including emergency assistance from specialists;
– nursing care;
– dental care (mainly for children and some other groups);
– ophthalmology (glasses are usually excluded).

Voluntary health insurance has a small share in the total funding of Norwegian health care. This is due to the fact that all residents of Norway are part of the public insurance system.

Climate

Norway is a Northern European country located on the western side of the Scandinavian Peninsula. Its area is 385,203 km2. The closest neighbors are Sweden, Finland and Russia. The shores are washed by three seas: the Northern, Barents and Norwegian. Sognefjord (204 km) is the longest fjord in Norway. Jotunheimen is a popular place for hiking. The highest point of the country is the peak of Mount Galdhopiggen, located at an altitude of 2469 meters above sea level.

In the west of Norway, a mild maritime climate prevails, in the center – continental, and in the far north - subarctic. The best time to travel to Norway is summer, from June to August. Temperatures are cool along the coast and in mountainous areas, as well as cold along the northern coast. Sometimes it can be a little hot during the day, but the nights remain cool. June is slightly cooler than July and August, but it is sunnier, with white nights in the south and midnight sun in the north.

A temperate maritime climate prevails in the south and along the entire western coast of Norway. The warm waters of the Gulf Stream from the Atlantic Ocean create a mild wet winter for the seashore. In winter, temperatures are kept within 0C, high humidity. The fallen snow does not lie for a long time, in the south it rains instead of snow. The amount of precipitation decreases from west to east. Summer is cool, the air warms up to +25C, and it gets colder as you climb into the mountains. The water in the hot months has a maximum of +19C. Autumn is characterized by frequent rains and strong winds, with the least precipitation in spring.

The continental temperate climate gives colder winters in the center and in the east of the country. Warm sea air masses are delayed, passing inland through mountainous terrain, so temperatures in the cold months drop to -20C, and snow begins to fall from late autumn to early spring. In summer, the air warms up during the day to +17C, at night to +10C. In winter, daylight hours are much shorter than summer, but in summer there are white nights. In autumn, in a couple of weeks, the foliage changes color and falls off, and if you climb to the tops of the mountains, you can get from autumn to winter. There are strong winds in the mountains in any season. Spring is the driest time of the year.

The subarctic climate in the northern regions located beyond the Arctic Circle makes Norway's weather here really harsh. In places there are eternal glaciers, the snow does not melt even in summer. The winter sun does not rise during the day, which gives the impression of a constant night. At night in winter, the northern lights are observed, the air is cold (about -20C, it can rarely drop to -40C), it often snows, it storms off the coast. Spring is late, sometimes it starts in May, there are strong winds. Summers are short, dry and cold (up to +18C). Autumn is rainy and windy.

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